Germany

Not for Children: Toy Production in China Part II

By Theresa

Have you ever wondered how your toys, those you played with as a child, were made? Part I has shown how the value added in the global toy supply chain is distributed among the German market for toys, the Chinese home state to toy suppliers and the four biggest toy brands which dominate the German toy market: in an extremely unfair manner. Who could be the three key actors responsible and capable to start a new game in the toy industry?

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Not for Children: Toy Production in China Part I

By Theresa

Have you ever wondered how your toys, those you played with as a child, were made? Or where the toys which you buy now for the children in your life come from? This post is the first part of a brief answer. We take the the case of Chinese toy production and its German customers and focus on the fair distribution of value and workers’ rights in this global supply chain.

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My Vision for Corporate Responsibility for Human Rights in Germany

By Theresa

If you want to surprise people working on business and human rights in Scandinavia, the Netherlands, the UK or the US, introduce them to the current state of business and human rights in Germany. Or, even better: show them the absence of human rights thinking in the mainstream German Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) dialogue. These encounters at the UN Forum on Business and Human Rights (UNBHR) in Geneva showed me that a post on this issue could interest some of our readers. I am a personal advocate of “you only gain the right to complain if you help solve the problem”. Consequently, this post presents you with my vision for corporate human rights responsibility in Germany.

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My Favourite Souvenir from Geneva: Networking at the fifth UN Forum on Business and Human Rights

By Theresa

My second visit to a UN Forum on Business and Human Rights (UNBHR) has again provided me with lots of food for thought. This post is dedicated, however, to my best souvenir from the 2016 Forum: great networking and valuable hints and advice. (more…)

Do we learn from history?

The Armenian Genocide and the economic interests behind it

by Sofia

Thinking of components, actors and stages of mass killings, we often think of the perpetrator and the victim in a specific set of time.  However, in big political arenas behind the visible actors there are usually the invisible ones. Their roles in crimes, if unrecognized and unpunished, threatens to prolong the process of remedy, restitution and reconciliation between all actors. One such event in need of re-evaluation of its indirect perpetrators is the crime against minorities in Ottoman Empire at the beginning of 20th century, particularly the case of the Armenian Genocide. Not only is it worth searching further for other actors’ involvement in this process apart from the direct perpetrators, but it is also worth extending the timeframe of the crime to its pre and post execution. Only this would allow assessing the full scale of the tragedy and redefine claims for justice from all involved actors. (more…)